Friday, February 21, 2020

Trouble and a Different Northern Post


This week I crossed a major item off my To Do list,
buying a new computer.

It's gorgeous and powerful, 
but it presents an exponential learning curve to this non-digital native.

A whole lot of computer and a challenged operator can spell TROUBLE,
and TROUBLE it was for me!


Terry, Heading for a World-Renowned Northern Location
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




Yesterday I published the latest IWSG Anthology Blog post
and discovered that I could no longer reply to comments.
My day shuddered to a halt.

Since I had been up until 3:00 am the night before creating the IWSG post,
the atmosphere was pretty tense in the Barbour household.
The fact that I had negotiated all the obstacles
my new computer threw at me in the wee hours was no comfort.

I spent two frantic hours trying to overcome the comment block
before giving up and calling Apple Support for help.
Of course, as soon as the tech and I got into my system,
up popped my Fundy Blue icon and replying to comments worked.
Sean-the-Tech kindly told me that sometimes a fix takes a little time to work.

So "Yay!" for me because I solved the problem myself,
and "Boo!" to me because I have no clue how I did it.

Getting Closer
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





I meant to do a Northern post for today, I really did.
But in the process of trying to figure out why only 42,000 of my photos
had moved over from my old computer to my new one,
and because of the panicked tailspin I dove into,
I ran out of time.

Time was the answer it turned out.
It takes a whole lot of time to move 113,000 photos and 625 videos.

And Closer
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




So today I'm offering a different Northern post.
I tried to calm my photo panic by playing with some photos that had arrived,
photos from a memorable time at Reynisfjara Beach 
located on the southernmost point of Iceland near the village of Vík í Mýrdal.

This black pebbly beach is magnificent, inspiring, and dangerous,
and its geological features are world-renowned.
Visiting it was one cold, spectacular experience!


Reynisfjara Beach
Near Vík í Mýrdal, Iceland
June 13, 2014
Photo by Terry Barbour
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved







Volcanic Pebbles of Reynisfjara Beach
Near Vík í Mýrdal, Iceland
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






The Reynisdrangar Sea Stacks
Near Vík í Mýrdal, Iceland
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




Iceland straddles the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and no significant landmass
stands between Reynisfjara Beach and Antarctica.
Those thundering waves pounding the beach have traveled a long way unimpeded.
They can catch a careless person unawares and drag him under and out to sea.


Rolling in from Antarctica
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




Most dangerous are the sneaker-waves, 
rogue waves that are much larger than other waves.
They can race far up the beach to drench, trap, or pull people into the frigid water.
Many people have been rescued from the roiling currents,
and tragically three people have drowned here.


Keeping Their Distance
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






A Powerful Undertow
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved








Dyrhólaey, or Door Hill Island
as seen from Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




The magnificent scenery is the result of a volcanic eruption
under a glacier that occurred during the Penultimate Ice Age.
It created the 340 meter/1115 foot high Reynisfjall Mountain
out of irregular, alternating layers of tuff, pillow lava, and columnar basalt.
The beautiful cave, Hálsanefshellir, graces the south part of the mountain.


Hálsanefshellir Cave
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Gazing up at Reynisfjall Mountain
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved







Terry Playing Around
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





The striking landscapes of Reynisfjara Beach have been featured in productions
such as Noah, Game of Thrones, and Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

The spectacular columnar basalt formations found here are said to have inspired 
Guðjón Samúelsson when he designed Hallgrímskirkja 
in Reykjavík, Iceland's biggest church.


Hallgrímskirkja
Reykjavík, Iceland
June 11, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Columnar Basalt by Hálsanefshellir Cave
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Columnar Basalt Stepping Stones
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Columnar Basalt Formations
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Columnar Basalt Formations
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




Terry and I would gladly return to Iceland.
It is unique, otherworldly.


A Geologist's Paradise
Reynisfjara Beach
June 13, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved








Till next time ~
Fundy Blue



By the Brier Island Lighthouse
Brier Island, Nova Scotia, Canada
August 3, 2015
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved









Notes:

1.  Reynisfjara Beach:
     In 1991 National Geographic named Reynisfjara Beach one of the 10 most beautiful non-tropical
     beaches in the world.  Wikipedia 

2.  The Reynisdrangar Sea Stacks:
     According to Icelandic legend, the basaltic sea stacks, Skessudrangur, Langhamar, and
     Landdrangur, were once two giants towing a three-sailed ship to the shore.  Unfortunately, before
     they could reach safety within Reynisfjall mountain, the sun turned the trolls and ship to stone.

3.  The Penultimate Glacial Period:
     The Penultimate Glacial Period (PGP) is the glacial period that occurred before the Last Glacial
     Period. It began about 194,000 years ago and ended about 135,000 years ago.  Wikipedia 

4.  Geological Setting:  Katla Geopark

5.  Columnar Basalt:
     Iron and magnesium-rich basaltic lava cools quickly at the surface, but more slowly within a
     lava flow.  When the lava begins to cool from the inside it contracts and fractures.  If the lava
     cools at an even rate and the heat escapes at regular intervals, hexagonally-shaped basalt
     columns can form.

    

For Map Lovers Like Me:
Location of Iceland
Map Data Google, INEGI, 2020





Location of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge





Location of Vík í Mýrdal, Iceland
Map Data Google, 2020







Locations of Vik, Reynisfjara Beach, and Dyrhólaey
Map Data Google, 2020



30 comments:

  1. Congrats on the new computer but sorry to hear that it drove you crazy! Columnar basalt fascinates me. I'd love to go to Iceland and see it for myself, along with that stunning church.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Iceland is wonderful, Debra! I want to go back so much. Why can't I have limitless time and money ~ LOL. Terry and I climbed to the top of the Lutheran Hallgrímskirkja church in Reykjavík. It has fabulous views; but for me it was all about the glorious architecture and its basaltic inspiration. When I saw the stunning columnar basalt at Reynisfjara Beach the connection between the two was striking. Have a great weekend, my friend!

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  2. Some amazing photos!
    At least the comment issue is fixed. That is a lot of photos to transfer though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Alex! I'm the first to admit that my photo collection is out of control. I hope that you have a great weekend!

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  3. Louise, your photographs are outstanding. I can hear those waves as I jump out of their way. I was once pulled under, actually it was just a few years ago. I can attest to the force of the ocean. Took two ladies to drag me out. Scary. Geologist's paradise is right.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Joylene. How frightening to be dragged under like that. I'm glad that you survived. I stayed near the top of the beach. I grew up by the ocean, and I know to respect it. I hope all is well with you!

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  4. New computers are frightening and equally amazing. Congrats!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Joylene! I have a ridiculously powerful computer for me with a LOT of storage. I can't wait to improve my skills!

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  5. Ditto down here with my new Macbook. All my many photos are still on my old laptop,. and some will be discarded before I bring them over. After Microsoft, this has been a huge learning lesson .!!! Paradise, our grandson would love that area, and now doing the last year of his Master of Science, who knows, he might get there one day.The Church, how magnificent the design is, and those steps, love the myth stories too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Jean! I never really got into the Microsoft products because we used Macs at school. I'm sure that once you learn the new system, you will love it. It's very intuitive. Kudos to your grandson ~ earning a M.Sc. is no small accomplishment, and geology is an endlessly fascinating subject. It took five days for my photos to transfer over. Of course, my collection is out of control. I'm slowly eliminating some photos, but I have thousands more to add. Wishing you and Hugh a lovely rest of the weekend. I'll be catching up ~ again ~ in the next few days!

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  6. No mistaking those rocks, very volcanic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No mistaking indeed, Adam! Here's hoping that you and Daisy have a happy weekend!

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  7. That place is gorgeous. No wonder you have so many photos.

    Whenever I have an issue with my computer, I call my husband in. Naturally, the moment he looks at it, the thing behaves and the problem is solved. Drives me crazy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm out of control with photos, Diane, but I get so much pleasure from them, especially those I can share. I wish my husband was computer savvy. We're like the blind leading the blind. Have a great weekend!

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  8. Hope your new computer works well. STILL have problems with these upgraded windows.
    My last poem was deleted.

    Have a good weekend.
    Yvonne.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Yvonne! One of my next steps is upgrading my windows program. It's a necessity I can't avoid. I hope all is well with you, my friend! Have a great weekend!

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  9. Great when you get a new computer, everything is much faster and less bogged down. Pain in the arse moving things over though, especially when you have lots.

    Well at least you fixed it, even if you don't know how and wasted the poor tech guys time lol oh the shame hahaha

    Those are sure some unique formations indeed. Sure some great landscapes to explore.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My new computer is awesome, Pat! Likely way more than I need, but do I care? ~ Nope! And all my photos are finally here! Iceland is amazing, my friend. I want to go back as of NOW! I hope all is well with you. I'll be catching up again. You'd think I'd give up trying, but I am an optimist ~ LOL! Take care!

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  10. What amazing photos!! I only wish I could have been with you, truly amazing. xx

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    Replies
    1. Seeing something like this together would be awesome, Kay! I hope all is well with you and Richard. It's so good to see you! Sending you hugs!

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  11. Hi Louise!! :) What an awesome place, the photos are beautiful. I love those sea stacks and the stepping stones!!! Looks very magical there, reminds me a bit of the Rocks at Hopewell Cape! :) Congrats on the new computer! I LOVE AND HATE getting a new computer lol...I'm happy once the initial shock of me not knowing what I'm doing is over...thankfully Alex is good at that stuff and he comes to my rescue each time lol!

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Rain! Thanks for stopping by, especially when I know you have a lot going on. I love my new computer. It's getting less and less perplexing, and I'm getting used to the right touch to have with it. Reynisfjara Beach is magnificent, magical. I'd love to go back! XO

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  12. Iceland! WOW!

    What is the yellow thing on the volcanic rocks? It looks like seaweed or plastic.

    These photos are so beautiful.

    By the way, 113,000 photos! What are they of? I can imagine future historians stumbling upon our modern day photo troves one day far into the future. Most will be photos of our food. ;-) At least some of yours will be of Iceland.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Sandi! The yellow thing on the volcanic rocks is seaweed. I've spent so much time around seaweed, I don't think about it being not obvious ~ so thank you! A lot of my photos are from traveling and from various museums. I always take photos of descriptions of things, like what a piece of art is, or a street sign so I know where something is. And some are close duplicates, in case I didn't get the shot ~ I'm behind in culling. LOL But then I have thousands more to scan and add. My photos are out of control! I have food too!

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  13. I envy those of you who travel, but I don't envy you so much that I can't appreciate what great photos you share with ut.

    Love,
    Janie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Janie! One of the great joys in my life is sharing my photos. The work is an amazing place, and I love capturing even a tiny bit of it. I hope your are doing well. It's awesome to see you! Hugs to you!

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  14. It was super cold and drizzling when we visited Reynisfjara Beach beach too, but how magnificent it was. We only had about 28 hours to explore Iceland (on a layover) but I would love to go back and rent a van and just spend a week or two driving the country. It really is otherworldly there!

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  15. Computers can be intimidating. I am glad you were able to overcome the obstacle. The photos are amazing you have traveled to some beautiful places.

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  16. Oh your new computer sounds tough to handle dear Louise but i bet once you are used to it things will become easier for you :)
    glad you had new one and oh dear you have quite a huge amount of images ,mine are hardly 2000 i think
    what about saving your images through google ,since my eldest son have told us ,our each taken image is saved by google automatically ?
    you visited such wonderful place
    beach pebbles are fascinating and i am amazed by these salt formations
    i agree you must have felt special there as geologist
    wishing you more happiness and serenity in days ahead my friend!
    i will have to get up as this is walk time before evening prayer but i will come and read your iwsg post :)
    hugs!

    ReplyDelete
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Thank you for your comments! I appreciate the time and energy you put into making them very much.