Friday, November 15, 2019

Sometimes You Just Get Lucky! Mitoraj at Pompeii


Did you, as a young child, ever hear a story that wouldn't let you go?
That made you determined to visit where it happened before you died?
On May 20, 2016 I finally realized one such dream.

I stood in the Forum in Pompeii and looked to the north at Mount Vesuvius,
imagining the horror of the 79 A.D. eruption that destroyed the city.

The volcano literally blew its top off and ejected a column
of hot gases and volcanic debris into the stratosphere.
Ash and pumice rained on Pompeii for over eighteen hours
and accumulated to a depth of 9.2 feet (2.8 meters).
Then hot, dense, rapid flows of gas and volcanic material
buried the city, killing any living things in their paths.  

Mount Vesuvius from Pompeii's Forum
Regio VII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



To walk the streets and explore the buildings of Pompeii was beyond amazing!
But for those of us fortunate enough to visit this storied place
between May 14, 2016 and May 1, 2017 there was an extraordinary event.

For me Pompeii has always been about the violent volcano, 
the unparalleled look into the lives of Pompeii's citizens,
the buildings and public spaces, humble and grand,
the frescoes, statuary, mosaics, and architecture.

I did not anticipate a temporary exhibit of monumental sculptures
by a Polish artist I had never heard of and likely never would have:
an exhibit that had me standing in awe at the sight
of huge, fragmented, and broken heads and bodies.


Hermanos
Brothers (2010)
by Igor Mitoraj
Bronze: 293 cm. X 326 cm. X 295 cm. 
Outside, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Ikaro Blu or Blue Icarus (2013) and Tindareus (1997)
by Igor Mitoraj 
Forum with Mount Vesuvius in the background, 
Regio VII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





The Back of Eros Alato Con Mano
Winged Eros with Hand (2013 ~ bronze)
by Igor Mitoraj 
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






The Front of Eros Alato Con Mano
Winged Eros with Hand (2013 ~ bronze)
by Igor Mitoraj 
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




Initially Terry and I explored Pompeii in a guided group.
This made it difficult for me to gather information on the Igor Mitoraj sculptures; 
but I kept photographing them because they were hauntingly beautiful.
It wasn't until much later that I was able to find out more
about this Polish artist and his huge sculptures.


Gambe Alato or Winged Legs (left) and Torso di Ikaro (right) 
by Igor Mitoraj 
Looking toward the Teatro Grande from the Triangular Forum 
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Ikaria (left ~ 1996) and Ikaro Alato (right ~ 2000)
by Igor Mitoraj 
Looking from within the Teatro Grande
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Teseo Screpolato (2011)
by Igor Mitoraj 
Bronze: 295 cm. X 188 cm. X 180 cm. 
Looking toward the Quadriportico by the Theaters
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




Igor Mitoraj was born in Oederan, Germany on March 26, 1944,
the child of a Polish mother and a French father.
After the end of WW II, he returned to Poland with his mother
and grew up in Grójec, southwest of Warsaw.
He graduated from art school in Bielsko-Biała
and studied painting at the Jan Matejko Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków.

Mitoraj turned to sculpture and traveled in Mexico, France, and Italy
to increase his artistic knowledge as he worked with bronze terracotta, and marble.


Igor Mitoraj
29 April, 2014


Mitoraj's monumental sculptures tap into the classical Greek and Roman tradition
that emphasizes idealized, perfectly proportioned human bodies and unemotional faces.
His truncated torsos and severed limbs reflect the damage
suffered by many of those ancient sculptures throughout time.

Mitoraj wanted his sculptures to reveal human nature and human imperfection.
He said of his art:  “The idea of beauty is ambiguous, a double-edged sword
that can easily hurt you, causing pain and torture.  
My art is an example of this dichotomy: 
mesmerizing perfection attached to corrupted imperfection.”
artsy


 Ikaro(left),  Ikaria Bretelle(center), and Ikaro Screpolato (right) 
by Igor Mitoraj 
Looking toward the Basilica near the west corner of the Forum 
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Ikaro Screpolato or Ikaro Cracked (1998) 
by Igor Mitoraj
Adjacent to the Basilica near the west corner of the Forum 
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved







The Feet of Ikaro Screpolato (Icarus Cracked) 
by Igor Mitoraj 
Adjacent to the Basilica near the west corner of the Forum 
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved







 Ikaro Screpolato (left),  Ikaria Bretelle (center), and Ikaro (right) 
by Igor Mitoraj

Ikaro Screpolato Bronze: 360 cm. X 120 cm. X 85 cm.
Ikaria Bretelle Bronze: 373 cm. X 153 cm. X 111 cm.
Ikaro Bronze: 360 cm. X 120 cm. X 85 cm. 
  
By the Basilica near the west corner of the Forum 
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





As a writer, I am always fascinated by the creative process,
especially with how inspiration strikes and where ideas come from.

Mitoraj said of his process, "There are no theories, there are no explanations.
The works impose themselves on me - I am their slave."
ansa  

The tragic story of Daedalus and Icarus inspired Mitoraj,
and the exhibit contained a number of magnificent sculptures
based on the two:
Daedalus, the skilled craftsman and artist who created 
the labyrinth for King Minos of Crete,
and his son Icarus who flew too close to the sun with wax wings
and plunged to the earth when they melted.

King Minos had imprisoned father and son in the labyrinth,
and Daedalus and Icarus tried to escape with wings crafted by Daedalus.
Icarus drowned in the Mediterranean while his father watched from above.

Mitoraj built on the legend by imagining a sister Ikaria for Ikaro (Icarus).

The Death of Icarus 
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
Daedalus and Icarus fresco, villa imperiale, Pompeii

To me there was a wonderful synergy in the connection
between ancient Pompeii and Igor Mitoraj's art.

After the exhibit ended, the Mitoraj Foundation and the Contini Art Gallery
gave Italy a gift of Mitoraj's Daedalus, one of his sculptures displayed in Pompeii.
It will remain at the entrance to Pompeii near the Temple of Venus.

Daedalus
by Igor Mitoraj 
At the Entrance to Pompeii near the Temple of Venus
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Daedalus
by Igor Mitoraj 
Overlooking the Sorrento Peninsula from the Temple of Venus
Regio VIII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved


   
It was Mitoraj's dream to have his sculptures displayed in Pompeii.
He selected the exact location for each sculpture chosen for the temporary exhibit.
Sadly, he died in Paris on October 6, 2014 and never saw his sculptures
in situ among the excavations of ancient Pompeii.

This extraordinary exhibit was designed and promoted
by the foundation Terzo Pilastro ~ Italia e Mediterraneo,
with the support of the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism.
It was organized by Pompeii's Superintendency, the Contini Art Gallery,
and the Atelier Igor Mitoraj Contemporary Art Museum in Pietrasanta.

Centauro or Centaur 
by Igor Mitoraj 
Forum, Regio VII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Pompeiani III (2007) 
by Igor Mitoraj
Bronze and Marble: 176 cm. X 75 cm. X 75.5 cm. 
Terme Stabiane or Stabian Baths
Regio VII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





One of the Few Female Sculptures at the Pompeii Exhibit 
by Igor Mitoraj
Terme Stabiane or Stabian Baths
Regio VII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Grande Toscano (1981)
by Igor Mitoraj
Bronze: 272 cm. X 185 cm. X 80 cm. 
Forum, Regio VII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





The temporary Mitoraj exhibit in Pompeii may be long over,
but I will always remember how exquisite these sculptures were.

To think I knew nothing about it, when I first walked into Pompeii.
Sometimes you just get lucky!


Memorie (2012)
by Igor Mitoraj
Forum, Regio VII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved








Till next time ~
Fundy Blue

A Very Overloaded Me 
after eight hours running around 
Pompei Scavi, Italy 
May 20, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




Note:  I did extensive research for this post.  
I have provided the best information, documentation, and attributions that I could.  
It was difficult because source after source contained similar or verbatim passages,
and for some sources I had to translate text from Italian with Google Translator.  
Any mistakes are mine.


For Map Lovers Like Me:


Location of Italy
Attribution: User:David Liuzzo



Location of Pompeii



Location of Modern and Ancient Pompeii




Ikaro Blu or Blue Icarus (2013)
by Igor Mitoraj 
Bronze: 223 cm. X 650 cm. X 238 cm. 
Forum, Regio VII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved







Tindareus (1997)
by Igor Mitoraj 
Forum with Mount Vesuvius in the background, 
Regio VII, Ancient Pompeii, Italy
May 20, 2016
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Friday, November 8, 2019

Post Under Construction


Things did not go according to plans today.
My post is still under construction.


© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved


I am not going to tempt the universe to derail me,
by saying anything about when it will appear.
Or what and where it is about.

Have a great Friday!





Till next time ~
Fundy Blue

On Chad and Sisters Two
On the Bay of Fundy
Long Island, Nova Scotia, Canada
July 31, 2014
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




Wednesday, November 6, 2019

IWSG Day: Wednesday, November 5, 2019 ~ A Surprising Find






It's the first Wednesday of the month,
the day that members of the
Insecure Writer's Support Group
share their writing struggles
and writing successes
and offer their encouragement
and support to fellow writers.






To visit the IWSG website, click here.

To become a member of the IWSG, click here.

Our wonderful co-hosts who are volunteering today,
along with IWSG founder Alex Cavanaugh are:
Sadira Stone,  Patricia Josephine, Lisa Buie-Collard, and Erika Beebe, and C. Lee McKenzie.

I hope you have a chance to visit today's hosts and thank them for co-hosting.
I'm sure they would appreciate a visit and an encouraging comment.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Every month the IWSG announces a question that members can answer
with advice, insight, a personal experience, or a story in their IWSG posts.

Or, the question can inspire members
if they aren't sure what to write about on IWSG Day.

Remember the question is optional.
This month's featured question is:

What's the strangest thing you've ever googled in researching a story?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hi, Everyone!
I can't believe it's already IWSG Day again!
I hope that you've all had a great October
and made progress with your writing goals.

At first glance, this month's question seemed easy, 
until I actually tried to think of the strangest thing
I've googled while doing research for a story.

I have literally googled thousands and thousands of things
since I discovered the wonders of Google Search,
amazing to someone who grew up information-starved in isolated places. 


When Information Was Hard to Find
Donnie, Me, and Roy
Atholville, New Brunswick, Canada
Fall, 1956
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved


Most of this research has been prompted by my writing:
from how to knap a flint knife and butcher meat,
to the formation of elements in dying stars,
to Roman bridge construction in ancient Italy, 
to what happens to a person's body when cut by a chainsaw,
to French coins and Miꞌkmaq names from 1600.


Nucleosynthesis


Finally I gave up and went with a recent search
that prompted a lot of discussion among my family and friends.
I haven't used it in a story yet, but I'll work it in somewhere.
It was something I had never thought of before
and didn't expect to find anything about.

I was cleaning the freezer one Sunday morning while listening to Fareed Zakaria,
when I pulled out a bag of freezer-burned hotdog buns,
leftovers from our July 4th celebration.
I tried to throw them into the garbage, but I just couldn't do it ~
Too many frugal great aunts in my lineage.

What to do?  What to do? I thought, tossing the bag back and forth in my hands.
And then it hit me, Maybe I can use the hotdog buns to make bread pudding!

I never for a second believed I'd find a recipe,
but I entered a search in Google and one popped up instantly:
justapinch.com

I had more buns than the recipe called for,
so I played around with the ingredients and proportions,
chose butter over margarine, and substituted half and half for much of the milk.
That leftover hotdog bun bread pudding was scrumptious!

Ample butter, cream, and sugar makes most things mouthwatering!
And when you top a concoction with homemade whipped cream, it's even better!

In no time we were out of whipped cream
and down to the last half bun each.

The Last Bit
Way Better Than It Looks!
October , 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved


Over the next few days I described my creation to family and friends,
joking about channeling my inner Newfoundlander.
No one was impressed.  Everyone was aghast.
You made What?!

Oh well ~ No imagination.  Their loss.  My win. 
Well, until I climbed on my scale!

I didn't write much in the past two or three weeks.
Cataract surgery slowed me down.
But I have my last post-surgery appointment this morning,
and I can't wait to get back to my regular schedule!

Happy writing in November!


Chilling After My Surgery
Aurora, Colorado, USA
October 21, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




Friday, November 1, 2019

Bubbles Over Brighton


Have you ever gone through a pile of photographs you've taken
and come across a few that seem a little odd?


Two Bubbles and a Pole
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



I experienced that today when looking at some photos
I had taken in Brighton, England in the U.K in 2018.

I was actually looking for a specific photo along I-70 in Utah,
but I was distracted by these.

At the time I took these,
I thought I was capturing some artistic pictures.
Now they strike me as a little strange.


Bubbles and the West Pier
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Bubbles Over King's Road #1
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Bubbles Over King's Road #2
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Chasing Bubbles
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Making Bubbles #1
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Bubble in Blue
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Bubbles Over the Beach
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Other Photographers Capturing Bubbles #1
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Other Photographers Capturing Bubbles #2
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Bubbles at Sunset
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



I never did find that photograph I was looking for,
but then I was searching through over 112,000 photos.
Maybe I'll find it by next week!





Back to Reality!
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






Till next time ~
Fundy Blue

Donnie and I
On the Margaret's Justice Ferry
Between Westport and Freeport
Grand Passage, Bay of Fundy
Nova Scotia, Canada
July 31, 2018

© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




For Map Lovers Like Me:

Location of the UK
Google Maps 2019
google



Location of Brighton
Google Maps 2019
google



The Beach at Brighton
Google Maps 2019
google





Making Bubbles #2
Brighton, UK
September 3, 2018
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved