Friday, August 16, 2019

Tackling a Scallywag!


Finally, I tackled a scallywag I've wanted to take on for years!

It took me one hour and fifty-one minutes to slog through
5.26 miles (8.48 kilometers) of sand, water, mud, and rocks
but I did it!
And I can't wait to do it again next year!
Tides permitting.

What scallywag?
Only The Scallywag,
the Smith's Cove Fire Department's Annual Scallywag 8K.
It's a fun run and walk from the fire station to the beach,
across the sand bar, around Bear Island, and back to the fire station.

My sister Donnie and our sister Bertie's daughter Sara went for it,
while the rest of our extended family and friends cheered us on.

Sara, Yours Truly, and Donnie
Smith's Cove, Nova Scotia, Canada
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




Scallywag Route
Imagery:  Maxar Technologies ~ 2019



Yes, the Scallywag is an 8K event,
but for those of us who don't like slogging through icky mudflats,
the route is a little longer if we want to avoid the worst of the mud.
I do not like icky mudflats, so I walked 8.48 kilometers.

And, by the way, that mud sticks to your shoes, 
and clumps on in a heavier and heavier sodden mass
until you can hardly lift your feet.

My sister Donnie says you can use a skate-skiing motion
of your feet to glide across the mud faster, but I just sink. 

You can only walk to Bear Island during low tide
when the sand bar is exposed and joins the island to the mainland.

Bear Island at High Tide
from Donnie and Martin's deck
Smith's Cove, Nova Scotia, Canada
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Bear Island at Low Tide
from Donnie and Martin's deck
August 3, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Bear Island is one of two islands in the lovely and historic Annapolis Basin,
a sub-basin of the Bay of Fundy.

Annapolis Basin is 15 miles (24 kilometers) long in a northeast-southwest direction,
and 3.7 miles or (6 kilometers) at its widest point from northwest to southeast.

The Bay of Fundy is one of the greatest national wonders in the world,
because it has the largest tides in the world.
In the Minas Basin at the head of the Bay of Fundy,
the difference in water depth between high tide and low tide
is 53 feet (16.15 meters). 

The Annapolis Basin is more sheltered and shallower than the Bay of Fundy,
but its water depth changes 22.9 to 29.5 feet (7 to 9 meters)
between low tide and high tide, as measured in the town of Digby.
tide-forecast

Digby's Busy Wharf Scene
Note the dark brown poles.
As the tide rises the dock floats up,
held in position by the poles.
August 1, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




From the time I was a small child roaming the beach in Smith's Cove,
I was warned of the dangers of that tempting sand bar going out to Bear Island.
When the tide rises, it comes in fast, the water is cold, and there are treacherous currents.

My father threatened to skin my siblings and me alive if he caught us on the sand bar,
but it was the story of our mother's near drowning when she was nine or ten
that kept us on the shore and away from the beckoning bar.

Were it not for the quick action of her Uncle Donald,
who was tending his fishing weir not far from the sand bar, she would have drowned.
She was up to her neck in water when he reached her and dragged her into his dory.

A Deceiving Lure 
from Donnie and Martin's deck
August 3, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



I was very excited to participate in the Scallywag,
because it was an opportunity to explore Bear Island's shoreline
in the safety of a large group
and under the watchful eyes of Smith Cove's Fire Department.

Although I had been across the sand bar three times in my life,
I had never ventured more than a few hundred yards on the near shore of the island.
I was too afraid of getting caught by the rising tide.

If you get caught on Bear Island between tides, you face a long, cold, miserable wait,
especially if no one knows you are there and can get a boat over.
The time interval between low tides is about 12 hours and 23 minutes;
and the sand bar is exposed for a couple of hours a day.
This time interval and the amount of sand bar exposed
varies according to the strength of the tide.
Regardless, you're looking at a ten or eleven hour wait, if you get stuck on the island. 


A fire department volunteer
patrols the beach making sure everyone is okay.
from the far side of Bear Island
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved


The Scallywag was a little late starting,
because everyone had to wait on the best position of the tide.
Last year the event started too early, and the faster runners
were running through water on the unexposed parts of the sand bar.  


Waiting On the Tide for the Scallywag to Start
Smith's Cove Fire Department
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Yours Truly Waiting on the Tide for the Scallywag to Start 
Smith's Cove Fire Department
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



The Scallywag is a fundraiser for Smith's Cove Fire Department,
which is staffed by volunteer firefighters.

This year, for the first time, the fire station will be able
to function as an emergency warming center,
should a winter storm take out electricity in the area.

Finally, the observers from the beach radioed that the tide was right,
and we were off, walkers first and then runners, down the paved hill,
along an abandoned rail-bed trail, past Harbourview Inn,
past the graveyard where generations of my family are buried, and onto the beach.

Heading Through Harbourview to the Beach
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



The Beginning of the Beach Section
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Walking Along Smith's Cove Beach
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Our family cheers everyone on by waving the Nova Scotian flag,
ringing cowbells, cheering, and clapping.
from Donnie and Martin's yard
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Through Sand, Water, Mud, and Rocks
Can you spot four runners on the sand bar?
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Onto the Sand Bar
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Crossing the Sand Bar
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



My sister Donnie pauses in her run to say, "Hi. ..."
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



... and snaps my photo. 
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



We walk together until we reach Bear Island 
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Bear Island 
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved




I have heard rumors of bears sighted on Bear Island during my lifetime.
Black bears are the only species of bear found in Nova Scotia,
and they are common throughout the province.

However, encountering a black bear on Bear Island is highly unlikely.
Bears are smart and search out easier places to find food.
They are also excellent swimmers, so I won't rule the possibility out.

Donnie's off and running again. 
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



The Far Side of Bear Island
with Digby Gut (the entrance to the Bay of Fundy) in the background. 
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Gulls Protesting the Intrusion
The Far Side of Bear Island
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



At the End of Bear Island
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Looking Back at the Far Side of Bear Island
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Looking Forward at the Near Side
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



The Locals
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Not Happy!
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Black Cormorants and White Seagulls
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



The Rocky Shore of Bear Island
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



A Volunteer Watching Our Progress
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Returning on the Sand Bar
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Looking Toward Smith's Cove
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Mudflats
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



As I approached the Smith's Cove end of the sand bar,
I could hear the cowbells, clapping, and encouraging cheers
of my extended family and friends greeting participants as they passed on the shore.

Nothing lifts your tired feet better than people cheering you on,
calling you out by name, and yelling "You go, Girl!  We're proud of you!"

"You go, Girl!"
from Donnie and Martin's yard
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Last year, one member of my family (who shall not be named)
decided to stop off at one of our cousin's houses 
after reaching the shore and have a cold beer or two.

The Unnamed didn't realize the fire department volunteers
were sweeping the island, sand bar, and shore looking for the missing participant.
Finally another family member tracked the Unnamed down and alerted the fire department.

Let's just say no one made that mistake this year.

Counting as the Participants Come off the Beach
near Harbourview Inn
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved



Back at the fire station, welcome refreshments waited thanks to the Scallywag's sponsors:
Digby's Subway and the Atlantic Superstore and Smith's Cove's Lazy Bear Brewery.

Some participants went to the Lazy Bear which opened its brewery for them that evening,
but I joined my family at Donnie and Martin's for more cheers, hugs, and hot pizza.

I was so proud when I finished.  I wasn't sure I could do it,
especially since I had gone kayaking for the first time that morning.
If time and tides don't work against me, I'll be back for the Scallywag next year.

The Final Water Station
near Harbourview Inn
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





Till next time ~
Fundy Blue


One Happy and Proud Participant
Smith's Cove Fire Department Scallywag
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved






For Map Lovers Like Me:

Location of Nova Scotia



Location of the Annapolis Basin



Location of Smith's Cove and Digby




Location of Bear Island
Imagery Maxar Technologies


Our Niece Sara (Standing) Paddleboarding with a Friend
At High Tide in Smith's Cove
from Donnie and Martin's yard
August 2, 2019
© M. Louise (MacBeath) Barbour/Fundy Blue
All Rights Reserved





38 comments:

  1. Awesome shots as per usual. Congrats on finishing. haha had to laugh about the sink in mud comment. I guess some can't just skate across. Uggg to mud sticking and such though, I'd go around it too. That is sure one way to keep kids away, tell them an almost drowning story. Things can sure happen fast. lol just wanted a beer and had everyone looking for them. rather funny, maybe not for the fire department though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Pat, for the kind words and for putting a big smile on my face with your comment! Have a great weekend!

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  2. Well done! That is quite the trek. Not sure I could jog all of it, but I could at least make the course. Avoiding the mud of course.
    Your sister has an amazing view of the island. Best seat in the house.
    And that is quite the high tide!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Alex! My jogging days are over ~ Well, they never really began. Now my only running is between tight connections in airports. Donnie's view is gorgeous, and thanks to the generosity of Martin and Donnie people often gather on their deck at any hour of the day. Have a good one!

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  3. How long does the tide stay out?

    What happens if you get trapped on the island?

    And, most urgently, are there bears on Bear Island?? šŸ˜¬


    "Our family cheers everyone on by waving the Nova Scotian flag,
    ringing cowbells, cheering, and clapping."

    I think this may be the most Canadian thing I have ever heard!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Sandi! Thanks for your insightful comment. I meant to include those details; but of course, I was writing my post late in the evening last night and forgot some things. I'll go back and add those details. But to answer your questions: From low tide to low tide is about 12 hours and 23 minutes, but this varies a little throughout the year. That means that low tide is a little over an hour later each day. If you get trapped on the island, especially overnight, you face a long, cold, miserable time waiting for the next low tide, especially if no one knows you went there and can get a boat over. There is no water or shelter. Black bears are common throughout Nova Scotia, but running into one on Bear Island is highly unlikely. Bears are smart and search out easier places to find food. They are excellent swimmers, so I won't rule the possibility out!

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  4. what an adventure dear Louise :)))

    thank you for brightening my evening with enchanting images

    there is so much love ,energy and positivity in your writing and photos specially

    this walk within puddle sounds really fascinating to me , i wish i can do this ,i bet it will be hard to stop when path is never ending

    stories from your childhood are always very compelling , glad you were safe my friend

    53 feet is really high sounds like "water mountain " to me :)

    your niece and sister are so lovely and i loved your precious images as well

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Baili! Thank you for another uplifting comment! Fifty-three feet is a water mountain, but it rises up over about 12 hours. At the mouth of the Shubenecadie River near the head of the Bay of Fundy, you can ride the tide's leading wave (or tidal bore) in a raft. As the bay narrows toward its upper (inland) end, the huge volume of water is forced into large waves. When these waves reach the mouth of the river, they actually reverse the river's flow and make great rapids to raft on. This is something I really want to do! I hope all is well with you and your family! Big hugs to you!

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  5. Good for you! And what a great view from that house! I would be outside there all the time. :)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Madeline! There is nearly always someone on my sister Donnie's deck; and sometimes there are mobs of people! All the best to you!

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  6. Oh Louise!!! How wonderful! Congratulations and I'm proud of you too!!! That's such a great event. I have a big pull to the Fundy Bay...The times I've been there, I've felt so at peace. I walked the Hopewell Rocks so often when I lived in Moncton...I miss that area so much and hope to make it my permanent home one of these days! Lovely post, thanks so much for sharing!!!

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Rain! I feel so badly because I am really behind in my blogging. I haven't even responded to your comment about kayaking on the Sissiboo. Thanks for being such a good friend! I absolutely get your comment about being drawn to the Bay of Fundy, but I'm familiar with it from the Nova Scotian side rather than the New Brunswick side. Of course, the Bay of Fundy and my love for it inspired my blogging nickname "Fundy Blue." One of these days, you will get that permanent home near the Fundy shores! I believe it!!!!! Bigs to you!

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  7. Way to go, Louise! Another lifetime goal achieved! Great photos too.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Debra! It always feel s great to cross another achievement off the list! Have a great weekend with your Rare One! Big hugs to you!

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  8. Sounds like a challenging adventure.

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    Replies
    1. It was, Adam! I had a blast! Have a great weekend with Daisy, my friend!

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  9. To tackle sonething you've never done before is always an achievement, Well done. Thanks for sharing your post and wonderful pictures.
    I too have often wondered about Andrew our mutual friend.

    Yvonne.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Yvonne! I'm glad that you enjoyed the photos. It gives me such pleasure to share them. I frequently send a little prayer out for Andrew. Take care and have a great weekend! Hugs to you!

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  10. This is epic!!! So many photos, and the details by each one, what an achievement , and with overs safety people there, a tally at the end to make sure you all returned safely , this is what makes a a community and a family so special.XX

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    Replies
    1. Happy Friday? Saturday? ~ Jean! I hope that you and Hugh are enjoying a relaxing day! Events like this make me believe in the future of humankind. With all the bad news emphasized in the world, I sometimes forget how many wonderful friends, families, and communities there are!

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  11. Oops, the words. "overs" should be "other", how did that slip through?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm guessing that autocorrect or prediction hijacked your word, and our brains naturally see what we expect to see. At least that's what I tell myself when I have an "oops!" Big hugs to you, my friend!

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  12. It was such a great evening Louise....I can't wait to do it again next year! XXOO Dutchess

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    Replies
    1. Love you, Dutchess. and miss you so much. I was going through a 1967 file today. There were a half a dozen letters that Dad wrote me during the fall of 1967 when I started at Acadia. Reading those letters again was like being wrapped in a big hug from him. There was a darling letter from you too! Next year for sure! XOXOX!

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  13. I have always loved the word Scallywag.

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  14. Dear Louise, this is a wonderful and fascinating post! From tide-concerns, recount of watchful heroic uncle, the care and safety procedures in place and the entire scenic wonder of it all. Photos of you, your sister and niece compose a lovely picture of good cheer and determination. My admiration to you all.

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  15. What a fun and informative post! The tidal information was fascinating - it's hard to imagine a change of 5 feet in water depth.

    Congratulations on finishing such a worthy event, and thank you for taking us along. I enjoyed every photo. :)

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Sue! It's great to see you! I'm sorry I'm just replying now. I had a bad fall, and my right hand and wrist got the worst of it. I'm fine now, and I can type again. Frustration ~ argh!!! I'm glad that you enjoyed this post! When we were growing up, we took the tides for granted, because that was normal for us. Since then I've learned how special and fascinating the tides are. All the best to you! I'm looking forward to visiting your blog! Take care!

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  16. P.S. I actually typed "50+ feet" - why in the world my tablet changed it to 5 is beyond me. Autoerror strikes again. :/

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    Replies
    1. LOL ~ I hate autoerror! It's always fouling me up!

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  17. What a fun post Aunt Louise! I wish I could have been there to Scallywag along with you! Hopefully one summer it will all line up right :)

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    1. Oh, Lisa! I am so excited to see your comment! How I wish you were with us too! I long to see you, and you are very much on my mind! Sending you big, big hugs!

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  18. Hi Louise,
    lovely pics and a good charity to fund.Well done!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Brenda! I'm glad that you enjoyed the photos. I had lots of fun taking them and sharing them. Sorry I'm just replying now. I had a bad fall the other day, and it took out my right hand and lower back. But I'm fine now. So it's back to catching up! I hope all is well with you! I will be by shortly!

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  19. Wow, I am proud of you girl! What an adventure!!!! Thanks for the great pictures!!!
    The family member who decided to stop for a beer, I bet felt so bad afterwards!! LOL!
    big Hugs My friend!

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Stacy! Thank you! I had so much fun! And yes the family member felt badly, but the cold beer tasted so good at the time. LOL I'll be by soon!!!

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Thank you for your comments! I appreciate the time and energy you put into making them very much.